Trilogia d’autunno
Sull’orlo del Novecento

Cavalleria rusticana

melodramma in un atto
libretto di Giovanni Targioni-Tozzetti e Guido Menasci
tratto da Giovanni Verga
musica di Pietro Mascagni

Santuzza Chiara Mogini
Turiddu Aleandro Mariani
Alfio Andrea Zaupa
Lola Anna Malavasi
Lucia, madre di Turiddu Kamelia Kader

direttore Vladimir Ovodok
regia e ideazione scenica Cristina Mazzavillani Muti
light designer Vincent Longuemare
visual designer David Loom
video programmer Davide Broccoli
costumi Alessandro Lai

Orchestra Giovanile Luigi Cherubini
Coro del Teatro Municipale di Piacenza
maestro del coro Corrado Casati
Coro di voci bianche Ludus Vocalis diretto da Elisabetta Agostini


Three operas, three different titles presented on the same stage on consecutive nights, in a real operatic “tour de force”: once again, the Festival manages to transform the Alighieri Theatre into an unremitting production machine. And the space on stage becomes a claustrophobic enclosure of distress, opening, closing, transforming, giving voice and substance to the tragedies that inform these masterpieces: death in duel, suicide, murder… going all the way to test these feelings. Visionary projections for the overwhelming passion of Cavalleria Rusticana, sharp shards of light for Pagliacci, more lights and projections for the suffocating Roman atmosphere of Tosca. Bold young voices, and the matching freshness of a conducting style forged in this very theatre, at Riccardo Muti’s Academy.

The sunset of an epoch merges into the dawn of a new era: Italian melodrama found new life at the close of the 19th century. Those were the years when everything – ideas, languages, experiments – inevitably led towards modernity, which would explode in the heart of the twentieth century and irradiate down to us. In 1890, Cavalleria Rusticana conquered theatres and audiences with its dazzling expressive immediacy, imposing “realism” in music. Two years later, Leoncavallo transformed an old real-life incident into a gloomy story of relentless passion. It was the explosion of what Verdi had called “parola scenica”, which threw new light on a century-long tradition. A light that shined fully in the tragic heroism of Puccini’s Tosca, whose dramatic strength and sophistication opened the new century.